Category Archives: long term conditions

Respiratory Nurse team awarded for work on COPD

The respiratory nursing team in Southampton came away with two awards from the Association of Respiratory Nurse Specialists (ARNS) conference in May.

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Emma Ray won best Poster Spoken Session. She said:

I was very pleased to have the opportunity to share the findings of our world COPD day event addressing smoking prevention in school children in Southampton at the ARNS conference.  It was the brilliant idea of our PPI champion Mark Stafford-Watson who sadly passed away last year and is truly missed by our team.

Mark emailed me after that school event to say:

“You don’t know how proud I am of the team who turned up yesterday and made the session so good, you very kindly said that it was my idea, but an idea is not much use unless someone does something with it, and I recognise the amount of effort you put in to make that idea worthwhile, thank-you so much”

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Mark made a true impact to the direction and value of all our respiratory projects and worked hard to be a brilliant advocate for patients.  The world COPD day event was a true reflection of his desire to improve the lives of people in Southampton and he was passionate to address preventing smoking uptake in children, which should be a key priority in the prevention of COPD and the impact it has on other lung conditions.

As our event last year was very positively received by the students and school staff alike, we are hoping to take this work forward and hold future events with secondary school students aimed at raising awareness of COPD and smoking prevention.

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Helen Kruk, Kate Gillett, and Emma Ray

Kate Lippiet, won best poster for her work too. She was delighted.

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Kate Lippiet with her poster

My PhD seeks to understand what people living with COPD and lung cancer find difficult about their treatment and what they find helps them with carrying out their treatment. I hope that my research will identify areas which healthcare professionals and managers can target to improve the experience of treatment for people living with COPD and lung cancer. I was pleased to present my PhD as a poster at the recent Association of Respiratory Nurses Specialist conference and to discover that my research findings resonated with the practical experience of clinicians who work with people living with respiratory disease. Winning best poster was a lovely bonus.

I would like to take this opportunity, like Emma, to emphasise the contribution of Mark Stafford Watson to my research. Mark practically helped the development of my research by reading and commenting on my study protocol and patient information literature. More importantly, he truly believed in the relevance of the research I am undertaking to the lives of people living with respiratory disease. I found his energy and enthusiasm of great help personally. He is much missed.

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Mark worked tirelessly to support respiratory research – seen here in 2016 testing new equipment
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Give me more: Why Insulin pumps aren’t just about what the doctor tells you – Claire Reidy

More and more of us are looking online for information to support our health (see Chris Allen’s work on support in Online Communities). In my research, I have found that the ability to get hold of that information and support, which is personal to you, can make a huge difference to how well you are.

I’m focusing on insulin pumps, which are an alternative means to deliver insulin to people with diabetes – compared to the more traditional multiple daily injections.

Insulin pumps have been developed to help people with Type 1 diabetes manage the condition better; both in terms of their quality of life and by more closely resembling a fully-functioning pancreas.

However, introducing a new health technology to an already difficult to manage condition is not necessarily simple, or easy.

Continue reading Give me more: Why Insulin pumps aren’t just about what the doctor tells you – Claire Reidy

Should Wessex implement ReSPECT process? – The NIHR CLAHRC Wessex hosted event May 11, 2017

The event in Southampton attracted organisations* from across the Wessex region and beyond and a wide range of people including the public, paramedics, nursing staff, clinicians, managers and researchers.

Many stakeholders were represented bringing together 44 delegates, all there to examine and reflect on whether the ReSPECT approach to decision making for emergency care should be adopted.

Continue reading Should Wessex implement ReSPECT process? – The NIHR CLAHRC Wessex hosted event May 11, 2017

Location, location, location – The social factors making a difference to kidney health.

Many of us don’t fully understand what our kidneys are for or how they work, but they are important to all of us. A team of us a CLAHRC Wessex have been conducting a big research project to find out more about something called ‘Acute kidney injury’, which is when the kidney suddenly stops working properly. This can make people very ill by causing a build-up of waste products in the blood and upsetting the balance of fluids in the body. As a result, people with acute kidney injury can have longer hospital stays and can experience serious consequences, such as needing dialysis or even dying.

Continue reading Location, location, location – The social factors making a difference to kidney health.

Breathe in the knowledge -by Lindsay Welch

lindsay-welchLindsay Welch is the Integrated COPD Team Lead; Solent NHS Trust and UHS NHS Foundation Trust

COPD or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is a preventable disease and is one of the world’s biggest killers – it causes a narrowing of the breathing tubes and air sacs in our chest and lungs, reducing the amount of oxygen we can get into our bodies. There are several causes, air pollution and exposure to dust, but the main culprit is smoking. It is estimated that over three million people with COPD in the UK but only a quarter of those are diagnosed

Continue reading Breathe in the knowledge -by Lindsay Welch

Are some social networks better for self-management than others? Dr Ivaylo Vassilev, Senior Research Fellow

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The everyday management of a long-term condition is almost never done by individuals in isolation from others. The networks of relationships around people may include family members, friends, neighbours, colleagues, health professionals and even pets all of who play an important role in the management of long-term conditions. This is through, for example, their knowledge, support, help with accessing services, resources and valued activities.

Continue reading Are some social networks better for self-management than others? Dr Ivaylo Vassilev, Senior Research Fellow

Where the NHS stops and online takes over – Chris Allen

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Chris Allen is a Research Fellow and a nurse in Southampton

There comes a point in everyone’s life when they get news that changes their life…of course it’s not always bad. Think “you’ve got the all clear” or “you’re going to have a baby”.

But what if that’s not so good. “You have diabetes” or “you have developed COPD”. In those cases firstly you might ask the doctor or nurse- “what can you do?” and “how is it going to affect me?”

Continue reading Where the NHS stops and online takes over – Chris Allen

NATIONAL CONSULTATION ON EMERGENCY CARE AND TREATMENT PLAN: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE TREATMENT ESCALATION PLAN (TEP) PROJECT? Professor Alison Richardson

Having conversations about the best course of action in the event a person’s condition deteriorates is difficult for everyone involved, whether it is the patient themselves, their family or carer and the clinician.

After an initial study on Advance Care Planning (A. Richardson, S. Lund1), research into the current application of treatment escalation plans across the country, and early engagement with some of the acute trusts in the Wessex region, it was apparent there was a desire to improve this process.

Continue reading NATIONAL CONSULTATION ON EMERGENCY CARE AND TREATMENT PLAN: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE TREATMENT ESCALATION PLAN (TEP) PROJECT? Professor Alison Richardson

The Doctor will see you now: Using models to think about self-management – Professor Anne Kennedy

My colleagues and I recently published a paper which describes how we created a model to show how people with diabetes become less dependent on primary care and more able self-managers.

We used maps created by general practice staff to show how their patients progress through the system following diagnosis.

In the current system, once treatment has been decided on, the frequency of appointments decreases and people are expected to self-manage with support from regular review appointments. Seeing the model and talking it through with GPs and others helped us to consider some of the shortfalls in the system.

Continue reading The Doctor will see you now: Using models to think about self-management – Professor Anne Kennedy

Love thy neighbour – why friends may be the answer to staying well.

Professor of Health Systems Implementation in the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton and Research Director of the NIHR CLAHRC Wessex
Professor Anne Rogers is Professor of Health Systems Implementation in the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton and Research Director of the NIHR CLAHRC Wessex

Professor Anne Rogers explains how weaker social ties play a role in helping people manage a long term illness.

With ever more attention on the NHS and how many nurses and doctors are needed to give people the best care, one part of the health equation is going unnoticed – What attention is being paid to the role of the patient and their extended network of relationships? In early 70s West Coast America a piece of research by Anselm Strauss and colleagues examined a set of questions on ‘self-care’.

Continue reading Love thy neighbour – why friends may be the answer to staying well.